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A Complete Guide to Throwing the Ultimate Wedding Brunch

A Complete Guide to Throwing the Ultimate Wedding Brunch


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Unlimited mimosas, stacks of pancakes, and a wedding cake made of waffles make for the most fabulous wedding reception

A Complete Guide to Throwing the Ultimate Wedding Brunch

Everybody’s favorite weekend events are brunch and weddings. So, if you’re a morning person who is getting hitched this year, why not combine your two favorite activities and host your wedding as a brunch party? A wedding brunch can be a much more casual, calm affair than an evening wedding: No one wants — or is expecting — rare steak, crystal chandeliers, or a black-tie dress code at 11 a.m. on a Saturday morning. This all means that there is a lot less pressure on you to host that over-the-top wedding, and instead you can relax, enjoy the lack of overwhelming expectations, and really enjoy your totally crowd-pleasing, wonderfully tasty, laid-back wedding.

Alternative Wedding Cake

Casual Dress Code

Hosting a wedding brunch means you can really make your party a lot more casual than you may otherwise. If you’re not keen on a formal, fancy wedding, allow your guests to come in more laid-back attire and leave their black-tie outfits at home.

Cereal Bar

Coffee and Tea Station

Create a Post-Party Plan

As your brunch party will be in the middle of the day, you need to avoid guests turning to each other and saying “Now what?” when the party draws to a close and you set off on your honeymoon. Make sure you provide them with a few suggestions of what to do in the surrounding area so they can continue the fun while you jet off on your romantic adventure.

Dancing is Optional

If you’re not a dancer, hosting a brunch wedding provides the perfect excuse to not have a dancefloor. However, if boogying is your favorite activity, it’s perfectly acceptable to get some tunes spinning and those feet moving at a brunch wedding.

Fresh Juices and Smoothies

Light Cocktails

Omelette and Frittata Station

Pancakes, Waffles, and French Toast Station

Party Games

You’ll need to keep your guests entertained at your brunch party, as it’s unlikely that they’ll be spending all their time focused on drinking and dancing. Set out some simple, fun games, and, if you’re a weekend word games addict, set out the weekend crossword at everybody’s place setting for them to puzzle on with their fellow guests.

Reception Timings

One key advantage of hosting a brunch reception is that the timings can be flexible, but you should never make your guests arrive at the venue before 9 a.m. We recommend that you serve your meal between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. to optimize the brunch setting, the range of breakfast and lunch foods, and the calm, weekend morning atmosphere.

Serve Hors d’Oeuvres

Suitable Location

The perfect location for a wedding brunch is going to be vastly different from the ideal evening reception space. If it’s spring or summer, you want somewhere that fills with morning light; and if you’re having a fall or winter wedding, opt for a cozy location with roaring fires and soft, comfortable furnishings.

Sweet and Savory Foods


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


A typical brunch reception will usually take place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. If you'd like it to be more of a breakfast, 9 a.m. is usually the earliest starting time to consider. Your guests' stomachs may not be ready to handle heavy food right away. Serve juices, coffee and cocktails along with some light, fruity nibbles before moving onto the main course, to avoid overwhelming guests who may still be wiping sleep from their eyes. Then, of course, comes coffee, dessert and wedding cake. Brunch is best served buffet style or as a seated meal (or a combination of the two). The other alternative is a cocktail brunch, where guests enjoy passed delicacies hors d'oeuvres style ( scrambled egg tartlets and mini French toast bites) and cocktails like mimosas, Bellinis, champagne and punch, as they mingle and celebrate.

Morning naturally sets a more mellow tone. A brunch can still be festive (think brightly colored flowers and mimosas), but it probably won't include a crazy dance party. Satisfy friends and family with a bountiful buffet and fresh juice bar. For a more formal atmosphere, go for fine china, champagne and a three-course meal. Have a decadent raw bar if you're really looking to impress. Also consider the time of year. If your wedding day falls during leaf-turning season, choose an ideal space where windows frame the colorful mosaic of gold and red hues. Planning a winter wedding? Consider a cozy brunch by a roaring fire. In springtime, a tented garden soiree or a restaurant's rooftop are both beautiful ways to celebrate in the newly warm weather. When choosing a brunch spot, remember to see it during the time of day you're planning your reception—ask yourself, is it dark and depressing due to a lack of windows? Does the sun beat down during the day, making the room sweltering hot? This will help you notice any potential issues ahead of time.


Watch the video: Olgas Wedding Brunch (May 2022).