Traditional recipes

Caramelized-Shallot Mashed Potatoes

Caramelized-Shallot Mashed Potatoes

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) butter, divided
  • 2 pounds large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled, quartered

Recipe Preparation

  • Melt 2 tablespoons butter in heavy medium skillet over medium heat. Add sliced shallots and cook until tender and brown, stirring often, about 20 minutes. Transfer shallots to small bowl. Add milk to skillet. Set aside.

  • Meanwhile, place quartered potatoes in large saucepan. Add enough cold water to pan to cover potatoes by 1 1/2 inches. Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium, and simmer until potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes. Drain. Return potatoes to pan and stir over medium heat until dry, about 1 minute. Add remaining 4 tablespoons butter. Bring milk in skillet to simmer, scraping up any browned bits. Add hot milk to potatoes. Mash potatoes. Stir in caramelized shallots and season to taste with salt and pepper.

  • Yukon Gold potatoes are used in place of the more traditional russets because they mash up nutty, creamy, and almost buttery. In a pinch, though, you can certainly use russets.

Recipe by Jeanne Thiel KelleyReviews Section

Caramelized Shallot - Mashed Potatoes

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons (¾ stick) butter, divided
  • 1 to 2 cups sliced shallots (depending on how many you like… I always use 2 cups)
  • ¾ cup whole milk
  • 2 pounds large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled, quartered

Preparation

  1. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in heavy medium skillet over medium heat. Add sliced shallots and cook until tender and brown, stirring often, about 20 minutes. Transfer shallots to small bowl. Add milk to skillet. Set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, place quartered potatoes in large saucepan. Add enough cold water to pan to cover potatoes by 1 ½ inches. Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium, and simmer until potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes. Drain. Return potatoes to pan and stir over medium heat until dry, about 1 minute. Add remaining 4 tablespoons butter. Bring milk in skillet to simmer, scraping up any browned bits. Add hot milk to potatoes. Mash potatoes. Stir in caramelized shallots and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  3. If you want… top with more butter. Why? Because butter rocks.

Recipe Tags

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How My Caramelized Shallot Mashed Potato Recipe Was Born

I recently tried my first recipe with caramelized shallots (a yummy pasta dish from Rachael Ray) and feel embarrassed that this was the first time I’d attempted to make them. It was really easy. But really slow. You do have to have some patience (at least 30 minutes) but I think the flavor is totally worth it.

This mashed potato recipe is super yummy. The flavor is like slightly sweet onion rings, dipped in buttery mashed potatoes. (Another great invention. I’m on a roll.)

Let’s just take a moment (center yourself and chant if you wish) to appreciate these beautiful white carbs before we start our No Sugar Challenge on August 1. Sigh. Aren’t they just a sight for sore and sugarless eyes?


THE HOSTESS

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I don’t know about you all, but I am *kind of* getting a little tired of all of these post-election posts. Here is something we ALL can agree on… mashed potatoes with tons of melted butter rule. Thanksgiving will be here before you know it and doesn’t everyone want an excuse to make a giant bowl of mashed potatoes? I added caramelized shallots, milk and a little S & P for extra flavor. How do you make your mashed potatoes?

I’m not one to screw around with Thanksgiving classics. In fact, I’ve never been a fan of classic recipes with some out-of -this-world crazy twist on them. They’re called classics for a reason! Keep them that way! I did however add a subtle change to my classic mashed potato recipe, that really enhances the flavor. Caramelized shallots add so much more taste and savory goodness, it was worth changing my so called “classic” recipe. Try it… your Thanksgiving guests won’t be disappointed.

*PS* Did you guys know that mashed potatoes are my FAVORITE food?

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Prep Time

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Cook Time

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Total Time

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Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) butter, divided
  • 1 to 2 cups sliced shallots (depending on how many you like… I always use 2 cups)
  • 3/4 cup whole milk
  • 2 pounds large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled, quartered

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Instructions

  1. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in heavy medium skillet over medium heat. Add sliced shallots and cook until tender and brown, stirring often, about 20 minutes. Transfer shallots to small bowl. Add milk to skillet. Set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, place quartered potatoes in large saucepan. Add enough cold water to pan to cover potatoes by 1 1/2 inches. Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium, and simmer until potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes. Drain. Return potatoes to pan and stir over medium heat until dry, about 1 minute. Add remaining 4 tablespoons butter. Bring milk in skillet to simmer, scraping up any browned bits. Add hot milk to potatoes. Mash potatoes. Stir in caramelized shallots and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  3. If you want… top with more butter. Why? Because butter rocks.

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Fried Colcannon

Total time: 25 minutes
Similar to Mashed Potato Cakes, but easier and quicker to make.

  • In a medium nonstick skillet melt 1 tsp butter over medium-high heat.
  • Add half of the colcannon and pat it down evenly. Let sauté for 6 - 7 minutes until crisp and brown on the bottom.
  • Using a spatula, turn the colcannon over carefully so the crispy side is up. It's not necessary to keep it together do it in sections.
  • As you are turning it put 1 tsp butter underneath the sections.
  • Once it's all turned pat it back together.
  • Put the remaining half of the colcannon on top of the browned side in the pan, spreading it out and patting it down.
  • Let sauté for 6 - 7 minutes until bottom is crispy and brown.
  • Now turn this over, adding the remaining tsp of butter and doing it in sections.
  • Pat it together and let sauté 6 - 7 minutes.
  • When done on the bottom again, slide it onto a plate and serve.

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Recipe Summary

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onion (about 1 large)
  • ¾ teaspoon salt, divided
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 ½ pounds Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and cubed (about 5 medium)
  • ⅓ cup fat-free milk
  • 1 (4-ounce) package goat cheese, cut into cubes
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Heat oil in a medium nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and 1/4 teaspoon salt, and cook 22 minutes or until golden brown, stirring frequently. Add 2 tablespoons water, 1 tablespoon at a time, as liquid evaporates, scraping pan to loosen browned bits after each addition. Remove from heat, and set aside.

. While onion cooks, place potato in a Dutch oven, and add water to cover. Bring to a boil reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, 15 minutes or until tender. Drain and return to pan.

. Place milk in a 1-cup glass measure. Microwave at MEDIUM (50% power) 30 seconds or until warm.

. Add cheese to potato in pan. Mash potato mixture with a potato masher 3 or 4 times or until cheese melts. Add milk, remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, and pepper mash to desired consistency. Stir in reserved onion, and serve immediately.


Vegetarian Thanksgiving

People often imagine that Thanksgiving dinner must pose an insurmountable problem for me as a vegetarian. But because my favorite part of Thanksgiving has always been all the "fixin&aposs"--the vegetables, mashed potatoes, biscuits, stuffing, relishes, and dessert--I&aposm just as joyful at the feast as anyone else.

I do like to create a centerpiece dish to stand in for the turkey, however, because side dishes are best appreciated when they are just that--companions to the main event. This year, I&aposll present an alluring Mushroom and Caramelized-Shallot Strudel as the main course with the accompanying dishes that harmonize beautifully.

Eating healthy should still be delicious.

When I plan a large spread, organization is essential to its success. The challenge of a well-orchestrated dinner hinges upon oven space: If dishes cook at different oven temperatures and everything must bake at the same time, then all the advance preparation in the world won&apost prevent a last-minute panic. For this reason, I have planned a menu with items that can bake at the same temperature while others cook on the stovetop.

You can also include a green salad, another side vegetable (such as steamed green beans with fresh dill), and your favorite stuffing. Dessert is up to you as well, but a traditional Thanksgiving dessert like Gingered Pumpkin Pie suits this meal to a capital T.

This menu balances flavors, colors, textures, and time challenges. Invite nonvegetarians to your spread without apology--they&aposll hardly notice the turkey&aposs absent.

Thanksgiving Menu
Marinated Lentil Salad
Mushroom and Caramelized-Shallot Strudel
Creamy Mashed Potatoes with Chives or Sweet Potato and Apple Gratin
Cranberry, Pear, and Ginger Relish
Herb and Onion Wheat Biscuits

Game Plan
Two days ahead:
Make relish cover and refrigerate.

One day ahead:
Cook the mushroom and shallot filling for the strudel cover and refrigerate.
Make the lentil salad cover and refrigerate.

One hour before cooking:
Remove the relish and the lentil salad from refrigerator bring to room temperature.
Peel and cut potatoes for mashed potatoes let sit in cold water.
Make breadcrumbs for sweet potato gratin.
Assemble the strudels, and chill.

Time to cook:
Bake biscuits decrease oven temperature to 400 degrees.
Put gratin in oven.
Twenty-five minutes later, start mashed potatoes.
Put strudels in oven when it&aposs time to add breadcrumbs to gratin.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 ½ cups sliced shallots (about 8 ounces)
  • ⅛ teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 4 (8-ounce) packages presliced mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons dry Marsala or Madeira
  • ⅔ cup low-fat sour cream
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon minced fresh or 1/4 dried thyme
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 sheets frozen phyllo dough, thawed
  • Cooking spray
  • ⅓ cup dry breadcrumbs, divided
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted

Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add shallots and sugar cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Sprinkle with water cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until shallots are soft. Add mushrooms cook, uncovered, over medium-high heat 20 minutes or until liquid evaporates, stirring frequently. Add Marsala cook 1 minute. Remove from heat, and cool. Stir in sour cream, parsley, salt, thyme, and pepper.

Place 1 phyllo sheet on a large cutting board or work surface (cover remaining dough to keep from drying), and lightly coat with cooking spray. Sprinkle with about 2 teaspoons breadcrumbs. Repeat the layers with 3 phyllo sheets, cooking spray, and breadcrumbs, ending with the phyllo. Spoon 1 3/4 cups mushroom mixture along 1 long edge of phyllo, leaving a 1-inch border. Starting at the long edge with the 1-inch border, roll up jelly roll fashion. Place strudel, seam side down, on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Tuck ends under. Repeat the procedure with the remaining phyllo sheets, cooking spray, breadcrumbs, and mushroom mixture. Brush strudels with butter. Bake strudels at 400° for 20 minutes. Let stand for 5 minutes. Cut each strudel into 4 slices.


Four New Recipes for Boring Thanksgiving Classics

Does your family fight over drumsticks, but leave a pile of mashed potatoes? Is cranberry sauce a nod to tradition, but not something anyone actually eats?

While you probably have classic family recipes that will always have a place at your Thanksgiving table, sometimes all you need is an additional ingredient to jazz up the tired dishes at your table. Try these four flavor twists on Thanksgiving classics. Yum, but they may take some getting used to .

Out with the old: Cranberry sauce
In with the new: Citrus sauce

Instead of plain cranberry sauce, try Citrus-Cranberry Sauce. I've never been a fan of the stuff from the can, but my mom started making this recipe from fresh cranberries, and it's now one of my favorite Thanksgiving foods. The addition of lemon, lime, and orange juice, as well as a bit of ginger, complements the tart cranberries and brightens the entire dish into a welcome contrast to the heaviness of other Thanksgiving dishes.

Out with the old: Rolls
In with the new: Popovers

Forget store-bought rolls. Homemade is so, so, so much better and well worth the effort. Don't know where to start? I've got two suggestions for you. Popovers are easier than you would think, and so light and airy, you'll have plenty of room for turkey and stuffing. Try these cheesy herbed popovers using whatever cheese and herbs you have leftover from your other meal preparations. If you don't have a popover pan and don't want to buy one, try these sweet potato rolls. Don't forget real butter. Get it out the night before Thanksgiving so it's at room temp for your table.

Out with the old: Mashed spuds
In with the new: Shallot and sage mashed

Mashed potatoes are essential for a Thanksgiving table, if only as a vehicle for getting gravy to my mouth. But plain mashed potatoes just don't do it for me I need something a bit more special. I love these caramelized shallot and sage mashed potatoes, and it's easy to use shallots and sage in your turkey preparation so your gravy will follow suit. My mouth is watering just thinking about it.

Out with the old: Pumpkin or apple pie
In with the new: Ginger and cider pie

If your apple pie needs a little sprucing up, try this apple ginger pie with cider bourbon sauce. You can have the regular stuff any time of year, but the spicy warmth of the ginger and bourbon combine to make a just-good classic an extra-special holiday treat.

What's your favorite way to spruce up those classic dishes that need a little something different?

Written by Kelli Best-Oliver for CafeMom's blog, The Stir.
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