Traditional recipes

Sandwich of the Week: Blues City Deli’s Muffuletta

Sandwich of the Week: Blues City Deli’s Muffuletta

Muffuletta-lovers can find a New Orleans specialty right in St. Louis’ Blues City Deli. A trip to New Orleans inspired owner Vince Valenza to “marry food and music together” and open an Italian sandwich shop in 2004. Of course, he added several of these Sicilian-influenced submarine-style sandwiches to his menu, including the “Valenza Special Muffuletta.”

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What makes it so special? Well, the focaccia-like bread is toasted and filled with layers of Genoa salami, smoked ham, mortadella, provolone, and mozzarella. As a finishing touch, the sandwich is topped with homemade olive salad. This signature item is huge and packed with protein; the entire thing feeds two people and costs $13.50. A half size is also available for $6.95 for those who aren’t as hungry.

The sandwich is as good as any muffuletta outside New Orleans, St. Louis magazine determined. They noted that Blues City places a slice of provolone between the bread and the salad instead of brushing olive oil on the bread slice. Nevertheless, the olive salad dressing is “first rate” and the salad is “chunky” and “not the least bit mushy.”

Other muffuletta options include “The Carmelo,” which is stacked with salami, roast beef, smoked ham, provolone, lettuce, tomatoes, onion, and Italian vinegar oil. Another choice is the “St. Louie Primo,” which features layers of salami, capicolla, mortadella, pepperoni, provolone, tomato, onion, and Italian vinegar oil.

Those who can’t make it to St. Louis right away can make Valenza’s muffuletta at home. This, however, is only a temporary solution. Sitting at a table next to a brick wall of jazz posters, and biting into the muffuletta while live blues fills your ears— that is the full experience.

Click here for other featured sandwiches or check out the 2012 Year in Sandwiches and the Sandwich of the Week Slideshow. Know a sandwich that should be featured? Email The Daily Meal or comment below. Better yet, become a contributor and write up your favorite today!


Muffuletta Sandwich Recipe

In my humble opinion, the Central Grocery’s Muffuletta is the best. It’s the standard that all other Muffulettas should strive to emulate! There are a lot of bad ones in the city. The one at Napoleon House is pretty good, it’s a heated version with a more finely chopped olive salad. They use Pastrami on their version, I’m not crazy about that part, but it’s pretty good. Pretty good, but like all others, it’s no Central Grocery.
I watched Emeril Live the other night, Mario Batali was a guest, and Emeril made a Muffuletta. Now, the meats and cheeses he used looked phenomenal, his olive salad looked great, but then he came to the bread. He used a nice looking loaf of bread, but it was obviously too much of a rustic loaf for a Muffuletta, I like something a little lighter for the Muffuletta (with sesame seeds of course), but I guess I can live with that part. But then… he cuts the bread, right, and out of nowhere (dramatic pause) he plunges his meat hooks into it and digs out all of the wonderful center of the bread on both sides and discards it! I almost fell out of my chair! My skin is crawling just thinking about it. The moral of the story is this:

Don’t do that. It makes my skin crawl. Unless of course you like it that way, then to hell with me.

Back to the recipe, I make a pretty good Muffuletta, but I’ll be honest, it’s no Central Grocery, but it’s pretty darned good. The quality bread, as I just emphasized is important, you need about a 10 inch round loaf with a good coarse texture, and a nice crust (not too hard) and sesame seeds. Here is my recipe, with a deep, humble bow to Central Grocery:

My Muffuletta

1 10″ round loaf Italian bread with Sesame seeds My Recipe
1 Recipe Olive Salad
1/4 lb Genoa Salami (Oldani is the best, and I’m relatively certain it’s what CG uses)
1/4 lb Hot Capicola (this is my spin, you can use regular Ham.)
1/4 lb Mortadella (I use San Danielle)
1/8 lb Sliced Mozzarella
1/8 lb Provolone

Assembly:
Cut the bread in half length wise.
Brush both sides with the oil from your 1 week old Olive Salad, go a little heavier on the bottom.
Layer half of the Oldani on the bottom half of the bread. Then the Mortadella. Then the Mozzarella, then the Capicola, Provolone, and the remainder of Oldani. Top this with the olive salad. Put the lid on and press it down without smashing the bread. Quarter it. You’ve just created pure heaven.

Serves: 4 light eaters, 2 hungry hangovers or one bad to the bone eating machine!


Recipe Summary

  • 1 (1 pound) loaf fresh Italian bread
  • ⅓ cup olive oil
  • ⅓ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon dried basil
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 8 oil-cured black olives, pitted and chopped
  • 8 pitted green olives, chopped
  • ¼ pound thinly sliced salami
  • ¼ pound thinly sliced ham
  • ½ pound provolone cheese, sliced
  • ¼ pound mozzarella cheese, sliced

Slice bread in half lengthwise. Drizzle olive oil on both sides. Sprinkle both sides with Parmesan cheese, basil, and oregano.

On the bottom half, layer chopped black olives and chopped green olives, then the salami, ham, provolone, and mozzarella. Cover with top layer, and cut into 4 servings.


Muffuletta Bread Recipe

Odds are, if you live outside of the city of New Orleans, you’re not going to find an authentic Muffuletta Bread, with the exception of mail order. That’s a dilemma, because without the right bread, it’s just not a Muffuletta. It needs to be a round Italian style loaf that is about 10″ across and has sesame seeds on the top. Good luck finding it! So do what I do, make your own! I based this recipe on the one from Terry Thompson’s wonderful book Cajun-Creole Cooking, with a few changes. This is actually a very easy bread recipe. The object is a nice crisp crust and a light center, you don’t want a real chewy, hearty bread for this sandwich. Well, you might, but I don’t who am I to speak for you. Anyway, here is my version:

Muffuletta Bread Recipe

1 Cup Warm Water (110 degrees F)
1 Tbsp Active Dry Yeast
1 Tbsp Granulated Sugar
2 Cups All Purpose Flour
1 Cup Bread Flour
1 1/2 tsp Iodized Salt
2 Tbsp Lard or Vegetable Shortening
Sesame Seeds
3 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

For the Egg Wash:
1 Egg
2 Tbsp Cold Water

Combine the water, yeast and sugar in the workbowl of a stand mixer, stir well and let stand for 5-10 minutes or until good and foamy. Meanwhile, combine the flours, salt, and lard in a bowl and work in the fat with your hands until broken up into very small pieces. When the yeast is foamy, fit the mixer with a dough hook attachment and gradually add the flour on low speed until its all incorporated. Scrape the sides down between additions. When the dough comes together, turn it onto a floured work surface and knead until smooth and elastic, 5-10 minutes, adding more flour if necessary.. Alternatively, you can let the machine do the work, but for me, bread is a touch thing. Coat a large bowl with the Olive Oil, then put the dough in, turning once to coat both sides. Cover loosely with a clean dry towel, or plastic wrap. Let the dough rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about 1-1/2 hours. Punch the dough down and shape into a flat round about 9 inches across (it will expand to about 10″.) Place the dough on a lightly oiled baking sheet. Sprinkle the top with sesame seeds, about 2-3 Tbsp should do it, then press them lightly into the dough. Loosely cover the loaf and let rise until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour. When the dough has risen, remove the cover, gently brush with the egg wash then gently place into a preheated 425 degree F oven for 10 minutes. Turn the heat down to 375 degrees F for an additional 25 minutes or until it’s golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped.


Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup pitted mixed oil-packed olives
  • 1 tablespoon capers
  • 1/4 cup chopped roasted red peppers
  • 2 tablespoons parsley leaves
  • 1/2 cup giardiniera (Italian-style pickled vegetable salad, see note)
  • 1 medium garlic clove, minced (about 1 teaspoon)
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large muffuletta-style roll (see note)
  • 1/3 pound thinly sliced sweet soppressata
  • 1/3 pound thinly sliced mortadella
  • 1/3 pound thinly sliced capicola
  • 1/3 pound thinly sliced provolone cheese

Ingredients

  1. Olive Salad—version 1
    • 1 cup sliced marinated artichoke hearts
    • 1/2 cup shredded carrot
    • 1/2 cup shredded inner stalks celery
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped pitted green olives
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped roasted red peppers
    • 1/2 cup seeded, finely chopped pickled Tuscan peperoncini
    • 1/2 cup pitted chopped kalamata olives
    • 1/2 cup sliced pickled cocktail onions
    • 1/4 cup drained tiny capers in brine
    • 2 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
    • 3 anchovy fillets, chopped
    • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
    • 1/4 teaspoon peperoncino flakes
  2. Olive salad—version 2
    • 16-ounce container giardiniera (assorted pickled vegetables), drained and chopped
    • 1 cup sliced marinated artichoke hearts
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped pitted green olives
    • 1/2 cup pitted chopped kalamata olives
    • 1/4 cup drained tiny capers in brine
    • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    • 3 anchovy fillets, chopped
    • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
    • 1/4 teaspoon peperoncino flakes
  3. For the muffuletta
    • 8- inch round muffuletta bread, split open
    • 2 ounces provolone, sliced
    • 2 ounces deli ham, sliced
    • 2 ounces capicola, sliced
    • 2 ounces mortadella, sliced
    • 2 ounces low-moisture mozzarella, sliced
    • 2 ounces Genoa salami, sliced

How to Make Muffuletta Panini:

First we’re going to make the olive salad.

The olive bar at my grocery store actually has a fresh muffuletta mix that you can buy, so if it’s available to you, feel free to use that as a shortcut if you prefer.

I’ll show you how to make my abbreviated homemade version.

Everyone’s muffuletta mix is a little bit different, but here I like to use green olives, kalamata olives, roasted red pepper, celery ribs and leaves, parsley, capers, and garlic as the main fresh components.

Chop all the ingredients into small pieces, and place into a bowl.

Mix all the olive salad ingredients with a splash of vinegar, olive oil, and black pepper, then mix well.

Try to let it sit for two hours, so the flavors can meld together.

When you’re ready to make the panini, lay out all the meat and cheese.

For the meats, I’m using mortadella, ham, and genoa salami. And for the cheese, I’m using a 4-cheese Italian blend.

Heat up a sandwich press, then spread the outsides of two slices of Italian bread with softened butter.

Flip the bread over and add a couple spoonfuls of the olive salad.

Then cover the olive salad with cheese.

Next layer on the mortadella, ham, and genoa salami.

Put the sandwich together and get it on a hot panini press.

Press the lid down and let the sandwich compact and crisp up.

Once the cheese is melted and the bread is crisp, take the panini off the press and move to a cutting board.

Cut it in half and it’s ready to enjoy!

Eggplant Parmesan Sandwiches and this Jalapeno Grilled Cheese are some of my other favorite hot sandwich recipes on the blog.


Proper Muffuletta Sandwich Stacking Order:

  • Slice the muffs (nickname for muffuletta bread) in half, horizontally.
  • Drizzle both halves with olive oil.
  • First Layer: Salami
  • 2nd Layer: Ham
  • Third Layer: Swiss
  • Fourth Layer: Mortadella
  • Fifth Layer: Provolone
  • Sixth Layer: More Salami
  • Seventh Layer: Olive Muffuletta mix
  • Top the sandwich with the other half of the muffuletta bread and press down.
  • Slice your New Orleans sandwich into fourths or sixths, depending on how hungry you and your diners are.


Reviews

OK, at little too much pesto.

I too make this sandwich on Trader Joe's Cibatta - a trick is to pull out the extra bread in the top half of the sandwich before baking,. This allows the filling to sort of "anchor" into the top of the sandwich - I use this trick on my burgers as well when using thick buns. As for the person who wondered about a vegetarian mayo substitute, at my local (Southern California) health food store, they sell a product called "Veganaise" (not sure if I'm spelling it correctly), which is a quite delicious vegetarian sub for mayo, but not particularily low fat (sorry!). It lasts only a scant two weeks in the frig so don't overbuy if you don't need it. But I really like the flavor and I am a meat eater but was once vegetarian for years and this is good, good, good. For the red bell pepper sauce in this sammie, I use the blender and puree one Trader Joes' jar roasted red bell peppers (or 2 good- sized fresh ones roasted, steamed & peeled), 2 TBL capers, 1 small/medium clove garlic chopped a bit before going into the blender, 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes and 2 Tbl olive oil and 1/4 tsp salt. This makes a great sauce for sammies and grains. Do not remove the red pepper flakes - this added very small spiciness really makes this sauce. Also, another sub for the pepperoncini is a deli-type item sold in jars in brine or placed with the olives in salad bars called "pepidew" a vibrant orange nicely sweeet pepper - it goes very well on most sandwiches requiring something moist. I too use Arugula for the greens and Havarti but a nutty Swiss can work.Enjoy the game!

We had the sandwich for dinner and it was delicious. We ate the leftovers for lunch the next day and enjoyed it just as much.

Wow! This sandwich was DELICIOUS! Used pain rustique bread from Trader Joe's, which worked beautifully. Used Trader Joe's Red Pepper Spread too, which everyone thought was key to the tastiness of the sandwich! Didn't have peperoncini so used pickled banana peppers instead. Perfect! Can't wait to make again!

I made two of these for a pre-concert tailgate party, and they got raves. Leftovers made excellent lunch the next day. Nice blend of flavors, especially with arugula. I've subsequently made them on individual hoagie rolls, and they've turned out nicely that way as well.

I make one quite similar. Mix equal amounts of minced roasted red pepper and mayo for the spread. I used quartered marinated small artichokes in place of the pepperoncini. Meats were soppressata, capicola and Genoa salami. A handful of arugula added a nice contrast as well.

This recipe is fabulous. Please do not rate it if 1) You have not tried it 2) Are "part" vegetarian (?) and 3) Object to mayonnnaise use something else. Crimony.

This recipe is delicious. I choose focaccia, havarti, salami, ham and prosciutto. Just watch your bread. I made less than the recipe yields and my bread was nice and toasty in just a few minutes. Would definitely make it for a party.

I am part vegetarian and seeing that there are more vegetable related things here than meat, I would say that I would like to make this over the weekend. I wonder if there could a healthier alternative to mayo, because we all know that mayo has a lot of fat in it.


The muffuletta sandwich is having a moment in Houston

Ragin' Cajun in Houston calls its muffuletta sandwich a "muffalotta" but it is constructed in a classic manner with Italian meats, cheeses and olive salad on a sesame seed loaf. It is served toasted.

Blood Bros. BBQ has created a new muffuletta sandwich made with house-made smoked capicola, mortadella, soppressata, provolone and olive spread. It will come on the menu as an occasional special.

Brett's Barbecue Shop in Katy has created its own Texas Smoked Muffuletta made with house-smoked meats (pastrami, turkey breast, bologna and ham), Havarti and Provolone cheeses and hot giardiniera/olive/red pepper salad on an Italian round loaf.

Darren Lafferty / Darren Lafferty Show More Show Less

Paulie's Poboys in Houston serves a toasted muffuletta sandwich made with salami, ham, mortadella, cheese and house-made olive salad on a proprietary round loaf. It is Paulie's best-selling sandwich.

Paulie's Poboys in Houston serves a toasted muffuletta sandwich made with salami, ham, mortadella, cheese and house-made olive salad on a proprietary round loaf. It is Paulie's best-selling sandwich.

Ragin' Cajun in Houston calls its muffuletta sandwich a "muffalotta" but it is constructed in a classic manner with Italian meats, cheeses and olive salad on a sesame seed loaf. It is served toasted.

Brett's Barbecue Shop in Katy has created its own Texas Smoked Muffuletta made with house-smoked meats (pastrami, turkey breast, bologna and smoked ham), Havarti and Provolone cheeses and hot giardiniera/olive/red pepper salad on an Italian round loaf.

Darren Lafferty / Darren Lafferty Show More Show Less

The muffuletta sandwich at The Hay Merchant is made with salami, capicola, mortadella, Swiss and provolone cheeses, and olive salad on a sesame seed bun. It is lightly toasted.

Julie Soefer / Julie Soefer Show More Show Less

The muffuletta sandwich at The Hay Merchant is made with salami, capicola, mortadella, Swiss and provolone cheeses, and olive salad on a sesame seed bun. It is lightly toasted.

Julie Soefer / Julie Soefer Show More Show Less

Ragin' Cajun in Houston calls its muffuletta sandwich a "muffalotta" but it is constructed in a classic manner with Italian meats, cheeses and olive salad on a sesame seed loaf. It is served toasted.

Montrose Cheese & Wine serves a muffuletta sandwich every Wednesday as Sandwich of the Day selection. It is made with pistachio-studded mortadella, hot capocollo, Genoa salami, provolone and olive tapanade. It is constructed on house-made focaccia from Goodnight Hospitality executive pastry chef Shawn Gawle.

Muffuletta sliders (three sliders made with Genoa salami, imported ham, provolone and parmesan cheese, olive salad and mayonnaise) from The Rouxpour. The sliders are available at all four Rouxpour locations in the Greater Houston area.

Tan McDonald / Tan McDonald Show More Show Less

A classic muffuletta sandwich is served at D'Amico's Italian Market Cafe in Rice Village.

Paula Murphy / Paula Murphy Show More Show Less

Muffuletta salad (butter lettuce, chipotle aioli, salumi, provolone cheese, butter croutons, pickled peppers and olives) is a new menu item at Brennan's of Houston.

Kimberly Park / Kimberly Park Show More Show Less

The Muffuletta Burger served at Hubcap Grill restaurants features a ground beef patty topped with house-made olive mix dressing, Swiss cheese and special mayo sauce.

Brett's Barbecue Shop in Katy has created its own Texas Smoked Muffuletta made with house-smoked meats (pastrami, turkey breast, bologna and ham), Havarti and Provolone cheeses and hot giardiniera/olive/red pepper salad on an Italian round loaf.

Darren Lafferty / Darren Lafferty Show More Show Less

Brett's Barbecue Shop in Katy has created its own Texas Smoked Muffuletta made with house-smoked meats (pastrami, turkey breast, bologna and ham), Havarti and Provolone cheeses and hot giardiniera/olive/red pepper salad on an Italian round loaf.

Darren Lafferty / Darren Lafferty Show More Show Less

After an employee described his experience eating a muffuletta in New Orleans, his bosses at Brett&rsquos Barbecue Shop started thinking about creating their own spin on the iconic Big Easy sandwich.

Pitmaster/owner Brett Jackson got busy smoking brisket pastrami, turkey, ham and bologna. General manager Jacqueline Herrera began concocting a version of the zippy olive salad that makes the sandwich famous. After weeks of research and development, Brett&rsquos Barbecue&rsquos Texas Smoked Muffuletta is ready to make its mark as a distinctly Houston and wholly barbecue-inspired version of the New Orleans-born culinary gem.

&ldquoThere&rsquos definitely people out there excited about the muffuletta,&rdquo Herrera said. &ldquoI had no idea there are that many people who love the muffuletta.&rdquo

Though not as widely available as the po&rsquoboy, the muffuletta makes a happy home in Houston. And in ways beyond the original construct: There are muffuletta po&rsquoboys, such as the Mandola&rsquos Deli sandwich the muffuletta burger from Hubcap Grill and a new muffuletta salad at Brennan&rsquos of Houston.

But it is the original, distinctive wheel-shaped sandwich stuffed with Italian deli meats and slathered with a bracing giardiniera-laced olive salad that gets the juices flowing. Especially now, when many Houstonians would have been visiting New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival or getting revved up for the annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival that has been moved to October. A muffuletta, especially one from its birthplace, Central Grocery & Deli, is always on the agenda for Houstonians visiting New Orleans.

Salvatore Lupo, a Sicilian immigrant who founded Central Grocery in the city&rsquos French Market in 1906, is widely credited with inventing the sandwich. Sicilian farmers who sold their produce at the market would go to the store to buy lunch &mdash salami, ham, cheese, olives and bread that were eaten separately. Lupo, according to the store&rsquos history, decided to make things easier for them by sandwiching the components in a round, sesame-seeded loaf. The sandwich takes its name from the Sicilian sesame bread, and its origins pre-date the invention of New Orleans&rsquo famous po&rsquoboy sandwich in 1929.

The iconic muffuletta is a thing of beauty: layers of mortadella, salami, ham and provolone cheese snug inside a round bread saturated with olive-oil-slicked chopped olive salad. It is that crunchy, tangy salad that distinguishes the sandwich.

It&rsquos easy to make at home by loading up your favorite cold cuts &mdash think of the muffuletta as a sandwich version of antipasti &mdash on your favorite bread. Herrera, Brett&rsquos GM, found her round loaf at Kroger from La Brea Bakery brand. Phoenicia Specialty Foods markets sells an Armenian bread called madnakash that can be used to make a muffuletta. H-E-B stocks ready-made jarred Central Grocery Olive Salad. Or you can easily chop up your own version.

The muffuletta is also free to interpretation.

At Paulie&rsquos Poboys (two locations in Houston), the sandwich comes with a light frosting of mayonnaise that helps its zesty, house-made olive salad bind to the bread and the stack of salami, ham, mortadella and provolone on a round, sesame-seeded roll from Houston&rsquos Royal Bakery. Lightly toasted, it is Paulie&rsquos best-selling sandwich, said owner Ann Hrieshie.

D&rsquoAmico&rsquos Italian Market Café in Rice Village makes a proper muffuletta. Houston&rsquos Famous Deli, 2130 Holly Hall, offers four versions of the &ldquomuffaletta&rdquo sandwiches including ham, salami and provolone turkey and provolone pastrami and provolone and its King&rsquos Muffaletta, the top seller, made with ham, turkey, salami and provolone. The Rouxpour, with four locations in the Houston area, now has Muffaletta Sliders made with salami, ham, provolone and Parmesan cheeses with mayonnaise and olive salad. Montrose Cheese & Wine offers a muffuletta every Wednesday as sandwich of the day, made with pistachio-studded mortadella, spicy capocollo, Genoa salami, provolone and olive tapenade on house-made focaccia.

Ragin&rsquo Cajun, 4302 Richmond, might sell the city&rsquos best-known muffuletta, which it calls a &ldquomuffalotta&rdquo for the original name for the bread.

&ldquoLike a po&rsquoboy, it all starts with the bread,&rdquo said owner Dominic Mandola, who uses sesame-seeded round loafs made for the restaurant by Cake & Bacon wholesale bakery in Houston. &ldquoI sell a ton of them.&rdquo

For good reason. Ragin&rsquo Cajun lavishes attention on its muffs, which enjoy a light smear of mayonnaise that is dusted with grated Parmesan and Romano cheeses. This step creates a binder for the olive salad, ham, salami and provolone that melt together when the whole sandwich is toasted in the oven. There is a welcome sharpness from the salty cheeses and bracing olive salad that gives way to the warm meats. The toasting lends a slight crunch to each bite. They&rsquore sold half and whole, and every Saturday a half muffuletta with onion rings and a soda sells for $16 as a special.

Though some New Orleanians may argue that a muffuletta be served at room temperature and never heated, many Houston versions opt for a light toasting.

Two years ago, Montrose beer bar The Hay Merchant put a meaty muffuletta on its menu, and it has become one of the most popular dishes.

Built on a round loaf from Royal Bakery, the Hay Merchant muff is filled with salami, capicola, mortadella, Swiss and provolone cheeses, and olive salad. The sandwiches are wrapped and refrigerated for 24 hours, which lets the olive-oil-slicked salad work its magic with the bread. It is then toasted before serving, which awakens both the bread and the meats.

&ldquoThe fats start to release. And you&rsquove got the hot olives and peppers,&rdquo said owner Chris Shepherd, who credits Hay Merchant sous chef Lucas McKinney for bringing the sandwich to the restaurant lineup. &ldquoI&rsquom an absolute fan.&rdquo

Brett&rsquos Barbecue Shop&rsquos smoked sandwich &mdash made with house-smoked pastrami, turkey breast, bologna and ham havarti and provolone cheeses and hot giardiniera/olive/red pepper salad on an Italian round loaf &mdash made an intense debut at the Katy restaurant last week and will return as a special on April 23.

Another newbie also arrived this month. Quy Hoang, pitmaster partner at Blood Bros. BBQ, recently fashioned a sandwich special made from his house-made capicola (which he smokes), soppressata, mortadella, provolone and house-made olive salad packed in a sesame-seeded bun made by pastry chef Alyssa Dole.

&ldquoI just like cold cuts. They&rsquore my favorite thing to eat,&rdquo Hoang said. &ldquoWe wanted to put our own twist on it, our own spin.&rdquo

The Blood Bros. muffuletta will be offered as an occasional special at the barbecue restaurant and certainly will have a home when the partners team with Dole to open their bodega-style deli shop and bakery at the Stomping Grounds at Garden Oaks this fall.


Watch the video: Iconic Foods: The Original #19 From Langers Deli Goldbelly (January 2022).